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Heirloom jazz guitar.

Wow , I am taken aback not only by the beauty but also the amazing tone of this guitar.I own 6 archtops of the highest order but must admit that this model compares very favourably with guitars which cost many times the price and some.
What more could a jazz player ask for,it looks great,sounds great in any position on the neck,solid carved woods,top quality hardware,fantastic size for maximum comfort,perfectly balanced,the list continues.
Forget the big names and get yourself one of these superb instruments.
You are going to be stoked.
Then all you need is to buy the products and you are well on your way to discovering the exciting and fulfilling world of jazz guitar taught by a Master Musician.
My hat's off.

Learn more than in the last 12 years

Hello Mr. Conti, What a pleasure sir, I have no words to express my respect for you sir. I've been working with chord melody over jazz standards for the last 12 years. Always finding of course multiple challenges and problems. When I bought The Chord Melody Assembly Line, I saw all the doors opening in my face: What a feeling. Thank you for that book. In one month I felt I learned more than in the last 12 years. So well explained.

Source Code The Jazz Lines

The Jazz Lines has helped push me to new level. I’ve studied scales for years but learning lines makes so much more sense and easier to digest!

Get music and useful information

Just wanted to write and say thanks for the 3 great DVDs I recently purchased. (Poor Butterfly, Danny Boy, Indian Summer). So much great music and useful information in the lessons....they are very thorough and complete.

D
The Jazz Lines
D.C.-.P.P.
I already see the possibilities

I just started going through Jazz lines video and even after only two lessons I already see the possibilities of this system. I am really excited as I think I found exactly what I needed.

Exactly what I needed

I absolutely love The Precision Technique video and the exercises, it is exactly what I needed.

S
The Jazz Lines
S.G.-.N.M.
Finally finished Disc 1 of Jazz Lines (Pt. 2)

...demonstrates how merely changing ONE NOTE in a line, or just moving up or down one fret, can change the entire key. This is REALLY important stuff, and for me was the key strategy for learning how to navigate chord changes. The other crucial part is the last chapter in Disc 1, where he goes into depth explaining the significance of diminished chords. This was mind-blowing stuff for me because it essentially explained how all the chords in a song are related to one another, another crucial thing to know when you improvise. Most importantly, Conti constantly repeats his mantra throughout the course: just keep playing your guitar, and everything will fall into place. This is so true. Just listen to what Conti says, take as much time as you need, and don't worry and think, Gee, all he's teaching me is how to solo over a 2-5-1. What about other chord changes? That will come eventually, trust me. One last thing - get yourself a copy of Band In A Box before you start this course. You're going to need to play Conti's lines over actual chords, so you can hear what they sound like relative to the chords. Without jam tracks or a program like Band In a Box to practice with, the lines are essentially meaningless.

S
The Jazz Lines
S.G.-.N.M.
Finally finished Disc 1 of Jazz Lines (Pt. 1)

It took me about a year to do it, but I finally finished Disc 1 of the Jazz Lines course. Disc 1 is the meat of the course, where Robert Conti teaches you how to improvise; Disc 2 really focuses on teaching you a ton of licks and lines, applying what he taught you on Disc 1.The one thing you need to know before you jump into this course is this: just take it slowly, step by step, and JUST DO WHAT CONTI TELLS YOU! You'll need to resist the temptation to over-analyze his instruction. Over-analyze it, and you're going to get confused and frustrated. Conti teaches you improvisation using the 2-5-1 chord progression almost exclusively throughout Disc 1, but don't worry. Once you get to Disc 2, you're going to see that his techniques work over all different kinds of chord progressions, not just 2-5-1s. His sticking to 2-5-1s on Disc 1, without you even knowing it, will prepare you well for improvising over a ton of other chord progressions. For me, the most crucial parts of the Jazz Lines course were the sections where Conti talks about voice leading, and where he explains diminished chords. He doesn't use the term voice leading, but there are a few lines where he...

Best without exception I have ever experienced... (Pt. 2)

...and am now working on your chord method and I just got the 12 bar blues book. Wow,,,,your blues feel is great, the lines are fantastic, I am only through the first 12 measures and it's tough but the results are worth it. Don't know if I will ever get to play out again or meet anyone else to play with but just the satisfaction of being able to play these solos is enough. I only wish as a sidebar you would include a simple melody instruction for the heads of the songs, I am still struggling with the backing tracks a bit as to where to come in. In closing I just wanted to thank you, I know this is your living but I truly believe you care about people and it comes across in your videos, I may never get to meet you but your my buddy for at least four hours a day and I feel like I already know you. So once again Thank You Mr. Conti I will continue on and continue with your products, they are the Best!

Best without exception I have ever experienced... (Pt. 1)

Dear Mr. Conti, I don't know if this is the proper place to contact you but in your videos you always say email and let you know about the DVDs...I am just on project 4 in the TTI#2 and just received the TTI#3. I am an older student, 68 to be exact, and have in the past played in a CW band for nine years. Always wanted to play Jazz and since growing up in Chicago have seen the greats, talked to Wes in a little club called the Wooden Nickel many years ago at a 2 dollar matinee no less and also saw Benson and many others in small clubs before fame came. As to your DVDs, I never knew of you till the last year or so and now I am your Number One fan for sure. I Love to hear you play and your teaching method is The Best without exception I have ever experienced hands down!!!! You are the first to lay it out where I can truly understand, I now use your picks and use the exercise book religiously, and you're the first teacher I have ever had that I believe in 100%. I have struggled to get through these first two CD's...

Over the moon with Since I Fell For You (Pt. 2)

part way through because it can seem 'too much'. That in itself is a major key to musical success in it's own right. I have learned more through doing an hour a day with clearly explained material than I did 'messing around' for years before - and I am now determined to become a fine solo jazz player. Some months ago my Dad passed away. He had a long illness but he was very strong minded. In those months he was listening to some old jazz recordings - He was a pretty useful jazz pianist himself, and I told him what I was doing with country fingerstyle. Well he always was a biased jazz purist - s he told me on his deathbed: Yes, but you listen to rubbish! I don't agree with that and I know you don't from your comments about your respect for top country players - but it certainly made me think about REALLY getting to grips with solo jazz arrangements. So here I am back on the horse, and I will certainly be learning one song after the other for the coming years till I CAN play weddings, restaurants etc.! lol Bless you for your fine work Bob as well as your good sense. I never get tired of hearing you talk as well as play – Honest!!

Over the moon with Since I Fell For You (Pt. 1)

Some time ago I bought the Ticket to Improv 1 and 2. I was progressing well with the second volume but realised that I would never have the time to play in a band - and so I employed your analytical outlooks to learning some solo fingerstyle Dylan tunes and I just got better and better. However, the thought came to me about what you said about anyone can Learn to play in lucrative classy joints or some such with your solo guitar arrangements. Thanks to the good sense of your approach, I now have a fine level of confidence about my playing, so I am returning to jazz solo guitar and have targeted the next 5 years on absorbing how to get those gigs. I have just received 'Since I Fell For You' and I am over the moon with it! I (personally) should have opted for these arrangements rather than the 'improv' from the start - but Hey!, - nothing is lost if you learn something new about music right? I have learned persistence and focus from your approach and material - as well as never to give up on a song...

A
The Comping Expo
A.G.-.P.T.
...1,000 lightbulbs began to go on (Pt. 2)

...as I was learning each comping rhythm, that there were all of these lines that I had just learned from you coming right out from under each chord (just like you said they would) and I kept finding solo idea after solo idea interconnecting up and down the entire neck at the same time. Wow, I understand now how this all goes together and it makes sense more than ever (I’ll never be the same, again because I’ll probably play until my fingers fall off!!!!). More importantly, I really have to embrace your philosophy even more now of how the original Jazz Guitar giants learned to play their stuff and I really believe that this was the way they did it out of shapes that worked and sounded good each time, and they used them all over the neck. It had nothing to do with any theoretical Mode, Scale, or Music School. Thanks to you, this is going to totally redefine my entire playing approach for every style I play and I hope that this is something that will make sense to people who haven’t yet experienced your method of teaching. This is the only way to go if you really want to learn and fully understand Jazz Guitar. Thanks so much again, Robert. I’ll post some videos of me playing, soon!!!!

A
The Comping Expo
A.G.-.P.T.
...1,000 lightbulbs began to go on (Pt. 1)

I had to write a second time because I had no idea what was going to happen when I got into learning your Comping Expo DVD and how it related to the other 3 DVDs that I had previously gone through (Chord Melody Assembly Line, The Formula, and especially, The Jazz Lines). The 1st two DVDs I went through were the Chord Melody Assembly Line and The Formula, and they both gave me a very good understanding of how chords are used and re-harmonized to make Jazz standards come to life off of the page when playing Solo Jazz Guitar. It also taught me a lot about the chord shapes that you use up and down the neck. Well, when I got into the Jazz Lines DVD, I learned how you build your lines and laid them across the different chord shapes to bring melodic solos that work without having to know any mode or scale (which is really great for me because I dislike theory dictating solos). What I didn’t realize, was what was going to happen next. I wanted to expand my knowledge of comping beyond the basics that I already knew so, I purchased and began learning your Comping Expo DVD. As I started going through the first couple of tunes and as I was learning the interconnecting chord shapes, bam! About 1,000 light bulbs began to go on all at the same time. I kept finding myself stopping and realizing that...

taking my playing where I want it to go... (Pt. 2)

...Ironically, that's why I thought theory was so important all these years. Robert's approach has opened my eyes, (and ears!), to bringing out the bop sound on my axe. My knowledge of scales/modes/theory has helped me integrate Robert's teaching fairly quickly; however, I completely agree with Robert that I've been approaching my guitar backwards for the past four years. I ran through the Ticket To Improv Volume 1 just days before a gig and I'm telling you I swung hard at the gig. My bandmates and the audience were totally digging my playing. It's not that I played all the lines with perfection, but my playing had that bop sound and feel. I laid down a hard groove and laid down several Conti licks (along with some harmonic generalization stuff) and BAM! I was tearing up the joint. What is most clear to me is that The Source Code series, along with several prepared solos/arrangements, is taking my playing where I want it to go quickly. And that's good because I'm 46 years old and need to hurry up and play! My plan is to purchase The entire Source Code series. I'm finishing the Chord Melody Assembly Line and own the Intros Endings and Turnarounds. P.S. Having Robert teach from the DVDs is what brings the books to life. He forces me to step through the material with patience which is critical to internalizing this stuff...it's like "a walk in the park!!"

taking my playing where I want it to go... (Pt. 1)

Until I came across Robert Conti's courses, I spent a lot of time in theory/scales/mode books and a few stints with teachers who really weren't providing good value. For the most part I'm going it alone, lifting licks off records for the most part to get my sound. This, for me, has been a slow process that seems difficult to work into our shows. I've discovered Robert's approach and style to be a perfect fit (I'm originally from Allentown, PA so Robert's south Philly ways are like a slice of home to me). I'm on the seventh solo from the Ticket to Improv series and am going to start Danny Boy today. Last night I created a chord melody to "There Will Never Be Another You". It is very apparent that I need "The Formula" next. My plan is to run through the rest of the DVD and then create several chord melody arrangements of some of my favorite songs before moving on to the Formula. My goal is to be able to play solo gigs around town within the next year. Along with that, I will master the eight solos form Ticket to Improv. I also purchased "Wave" which looks challenging, but I love the song and think I'm up to it as I already took some Ticket to Improve lines to 16th note runs. I do best when I understand what I'm creating on the guitar so I think the Source Code will be the key to advancing my playing to the next level...

The Flattening Curve (Pt. 1)

Bob Conti spoke about 'the flattening learning curve' on one of his Chord Melody DVD's, and spoke about how significantly easier it gets when the curve starts to flatten out. He was right in spades! The initial CM ('Since I Fell for You')took me a long time to get the grip of, but it's NOT hard to know what you need to practice to 'get it' - as it's demonstrated clearly and simply on the DVD. The second CM I worked on (God Bless The Child) started to recycle a part of the first one song, as Bob stated would start to happen... I only knew a few jazz chords grips before I started, but by this time I had mastered the majority of the common chords Bob uses. Of course I am learning new tricks along the way that will also be recycled in many more songs, but the curve is really starting to flatten now, and my speed of learning songs is rapidly accelerating. Another brilliant tip Bob gave was not to bother learning the names of every chord as 'You will pick them up through using them' - surprisingly, this is absolutely correct!!! lol I am now part way through learning 'Indian Summer' - a really show stopping CM if ever there was one. Bob has got even better in his DVD teaching delivery, by laying out the chords right through the arrangement from start to finish on the chords grip sheets - so people who don't know music don't have to keep moving around the codas etc, it's straight off the layout. The big question is: "How can his teaching GET any better?" lol I would like to say that I am more than satisfied with this world class tuition from a world class player. If any guitarist masters Bob's DVD arrangements then (even if it is one...

The Flattening Curve (Pt. 2)

...song at a time) he must become a world class guitarist himself in the end. I only spend an hour a day on the DVD's but my progress has been remarkable even if I do say so myself. Another great thing Bob pointed out was that when you have learned 30 to 50 songs, a guitarist develops the ability to 'know' where the song is going and play it off the cuff EVEN IF they have never played it before. This must work in the same way that a lead player can play a tune straight off because his ear has developed over playing so many solos. The jazz guitarist can manage to do it because he has developed the lightning fast and accurate jump to hit a harmonising chord to an individual note.So if he's heard the melody he can instantly harmonise it and play embellishments taught in the DVD's. I could write about my discoveries over the last year or two using Bob's DVD's all day - but the bottom line, like Bob says is: "It's all in the playing!". You learn jazz by playing arrangements NOT my knowing every scale and mode known to man. It's like you can memorise all the words in the English language but it won't make you a great writer. Neither will knowing all the rules of grammar make you a great public speaker. My advice (after decades of floundering around with these stupid things) is if you want to play AND really understand jazz get Bob's DVD's and watch the scales (from your eyes) fall away one by one. The byproduct of knowing this stuff spills over into any songwriters bag of tricks as well. Better go, the guitar is calling.

W
The Jazz Lines
W.Y.-.M.B.C.
You're also my official guitar guru (Pt. 2)

...in front of my local Rotary Club.  Your arrangement was tooo coool, so I took you up on your free offer, printed it, and a week later I had it down, could play it through without stumbling (much), smoooth.  It was the most challenging arrangement I'd ever tackled, and because of it, I'm continuing to challenge myself with material that's over my head and damn, it comes.  I amaze myself. I'm now one of your new DVD students.  Just started Jazz Lines, Source Code; one of my daughters got it for me for Christmas.  It was my big present.  I'm all the way through Lesson 2 and have watched through Lesson 4. You're a cool guy (the coolest) and a magnificent player.  You are also my official guitar guru.  I'm going to drop you a line from time to time because you continually say you like hearing from your students, so you'll hear from me (but I will be merciful and not write TOO often). I hope our paths cross one day; I'd love to meet you.  Please let me know if you ever play in California and I'll make a big effort to come see you.

W
The Jazz Lines
W.Y.-.M.B.C.
You're also my official guitar guru (Pt. 1)

Like your pilot friend in Texas, I put down the guitar for 12 years and picked it up back up this past November 10.  I had played for 15 years previously, but had never really played very well; I definitely had not gotten soloing.  But I could fake my way through chord solos, played in a big band for two years, gigged a lot, solo and with others, but I always felt like a fraud.  I could trick others into thinking I could actually play, but it was illusion. I'm 62, play an L-5.  I'm one of the young guys coming up that you often refer to. My teacher of many years - a man whom I adore - came from the jazz theory/modes/scales school; he would never teach me a line, saying my music had to come from within me.  So I chased scales and arpeggios and MODES and play this scale over this chord, all totally meaningless to me.  So I could play a scale fast over a chord...and it sounded just like that, a scale over a chord. And then, after I started playing again, I found you and your teaching approach and it was like some kind of epiphany.  No scales?  No modes?  Just play lines?  Oh my god, wow. I initially found you because I was looking for an arrangement of America the Beautiful to play...

best f**king customer service...(Pt. 1)

Until I came across Robert Conti's courses, I spent a lot of time in theory/scales/mode books and a few stints with teachers who really weren't providing good value. For the most part I'm going it alone, lifting licks off records for the most part to get my sound. This, for me, has been a slow process that seems difficult to work into our shows. I've discovered Robert's approach and style to be a perfect fit (I'm originally from Allentown, PA so Robert's south Philly ways are like a slice of home to me). I'm on the seventh solo from the Ticket to Improv series and am going to start Danny Boy today. Last night I created a chord melody to "There Will Never Be Another You". It is very apparent that I need "The Formula" next. My plan is to run through the rest of the DVD and then create several chord melody arrangements of some of my favorite songs before moving on to the Formula. My goal is to be able to play solo gigs around town within the next year. Along with that, I will master the eight solos form Ticket to Improv. I also purchased "Wave" which looks challenging, but I love the song and think I'm up to it as I already took some Ticket to Improve lines to 16th note runs. I do best when I understand what I'm creating on the guitar so I think the Source Code will be the key to advancing my playing to the next level. Ironically, that's why I thought theory was so important all these years. Robert's approach has opened my eyes, (and ears!), to bringing out the...

best f**king customer service...(Pt. 2)

...bop sound on my axe. My knowledge of scales/modes/theory has helped me integrate Robert's teaching fairly quickly; however, I completely agree with Robert that I've been approaching my guitar backwards for the past four years. I ran through the Ticket To Improv Volume 1 just days before a gig and I'm telling you I swung hard at the gig. My bandmates and the audience were totally digging my playing. It's not that I played all the lines with perfection, but my playing had that bop sound and feel. I laid down a hard groove and laid down several Conti licks (along with some harmonic generalization stuff) and BAM! I was tearing up the joint. What is most clear to me is that The Source Code series, along with several prepared solos/arrangements, is taking my playing where I want it to go quickly. And that's good because I'm 46 years old and need to hurry up and play! My plan is to purchase The entire Source Code series. I'm finishing the Chord Melody Assembly Line and own the Intros Endings and Turnarounds. P.S. Having Robert teach from the DVDs is what brings the books to life. He forces me to step through the material with patience which is critical to internalizing this stuff...it's like "a walk in the park"!!

Letter From a Former Student (Part 4)

...ago, it is simply amazing to see how little you have changed. Your energy, enthusiasm and commitment to helping your students comes across with professionalism and a sincerity that is uncompromised. Owning these DVD’s is like having the man himself sitting in my living room carefully guiding me, with a convenient playback button. I hold no reservations in stating there is no greater value for the student of guitar at any level, at any price! I apologize for the length of this little essay but it remains a pitiful example of just how grateful I am to you for your motivation, your inspiration and for rekindling a bright shining light in a once broken spirit. There is no doubt in my mind the line of people who could make that statement would stretch for miles. Someday in the not too distant future I hope to make the trip to Vegas for a private lesson. The wife wants to meet you. She says you remind her of one of the Sopranos. I keep telling her you are not a gangster, you are The Socrates of Swing!!! Take care Bob, we love what you do!

Letter From a Former Student (Pt. 1)

Hi Bob, It is doubtful you would remember much about me, Billy Stanley but I am a former student from back in the mid-seventies when you were in Jacksonville Fla. Because I was in the Navy, I was only able to stay with you for a couple of months before shipping out overseas but I kept virtually everything you ever gave me. I even have an order for two patty melts and a large coke that you wrote in that classic, hand written Conti style on the black of my lesson one night while you were starving to death but refused to stop working. Everyone that knew me back then said they had never seen anyone progress so rapidly on the guitar as I had while studying under you. As one may guess after we lost contact my progress slowed to a lame, geriatric snail pace. After being discharged from the military and returning to Charlotte N.C. I set out on a futile mission to find another mentor, anyone who could teach me anything about Jazz. This resulted in over fifteen years of frustration and wasted time and money. I will say in my own defense, I became a master at playing scales and modes at blinding speed and precision. At some point, out of frustration I walked away vowing to never touch another guitar for the rest of my life. In the late nineties, I found myself remarried to a wonderful woman who somehow sensed the sadness I had internalized due to my perceived failures related to music. After several months of prodding, she talked me into taking up...

Letter From a Former Student (Pt. 2)

...the guitar again. Having no real teacher I quickly fell back into the old habits of playing scales and modes believing that somehow, it would all click and I would become the entertainer I always wanted to be. After a few years of rigorous practice, I had acquired some monster chops so I resorted to the needle drop/route memory method. As slow as it was, I was making progress and was steadily becoming the player I always wanted to be. Just about the time things seemed to be working out, for no apparent reason, on Sept 16, 2004 I suffered a massive stroke that left me near dead and completely paralyzed on my right side. Instantly I had to accept the fact I would never play the guitar again. I was devastated. To this day, it has been the biggest heartbreak of my life. Over the last six years, the recovery process has been challenging, as well as encouraging. I am happy to say, but for the fine motor coordination in my right hand, I have fully recovered. About a year ago I found myself reminiscing about those flashy lines you use to play in your studio in Jax and I remembered hearing you had released some recordings. I went to the web and goggled, “Robert Conti”. What I found was “Guitar Instruction by Robert Conti” which took me to your current web site. I spent the next two plus hours surfing through every byte of your web site. I was delighted with what I had found and only wished it had been there twenty-five years ago. Staring down at my cripple...